Lemon Drizzle Cake

Lemon Drizzle Cake

Lemon Drizzle Cake is Husband’s third favourite kind of cake. So a couple of weeks ago, when I wanted to butter him up for something, I baked a loaf. The recipe is based on Mary Berry’s recipe, but with some tweaks. My son is barely two years old, so he was not much help. He did enjoy sucking some lemons while I did all of the work. And when Husband arrived home that evening, he was putty in my hands. Cue evil laughter.

Lemon Drizzle Cake
175g margarine/soft butter
250g caster sugar
Grated zest of 2 lemons
250g self-raising flour (sifted)
3 medium free-range eggs
4 tbsp whole milk (I use Lactofree milk because my son and I have lactose sensitivities)
1 level tsp baking powder
Preheat oven to 180C (160C fan-assisted). Grease and line 2 x 1lb loaf tins. Cream butter and sugar and mix in all ingredients. Divide between the two tins and bake for about 35 mins – test that it is ready by seeing if a toothpick comes out clean.
Let loaves cool for 10 minutes, then prick all over with a toothpick.
Mix 70g granulated sugar with the juice of one lemon. When you squeeze the lemon, it should be room-temperature. If it’s cold, cut it in half, pop into the microwave for 5-10 seconds, then you can squeeze the lemon much more easily. Spoon lemon and sugar mixture over the 2 cakes. Leave to cool in the tin.
* I take the remaining lemon and cut it into wedges, then freeze it. Perfect for adding to gin/vodka tonic, Pimms or even to some hot water.

IMG_1214 IMG_1220 IMG_1225 IMG_1240Lemon Drizzle CakeLemon Drizzle Cake

 

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Winner Winner Chicken/Turkey Dinner

Chicken, not turkey
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Upside Down


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